pain

Will My Teeth Hurt When Running at Elevation

Elevation changes may lead to tooth pain or a condition known as barodontalgia. If you are an avid runner, you may find that your teeth hurt every time you run at elevation. In many cases, the pain associated with a high altitude toothaches is caused by air that is trapped inside of a filling or cavity. Due to the fact that teeth cannot expand to accommodate pressure changes, the buildup of pressure may lead to intense pain in fillings or root canals that have been performed poorly.

You may notice that when you return to ground level, your pain completely stops. Even if this is true, it’s essential to visit a dentist as soon as possible, if you experience barodontalgia. A dentist can evaluate your teeth, mouth, and gums and determine whether there is an underlying condition that is causing your pain.

Fortunately, there are ways you can prevent this condition. Be sure to practice good oral hygiene and brush and floss your teeth on a regular basis. Also, visit the dentist every six months or so for regular exams and cleanings.

Although running is a great exercise that can help you maintain a healthy weight and improve your cardiovascular health, you shouldn’t continue to run at elevation if your teeth hurt until you find out the underlying condition that’s causing it and take certain steps to prevent the pain.

If you have further questions about teeth pain and running at elevation, feel free to contact Dr. Brian Levitin at Mile High Smiles.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Breaking The Pain Barrier: How To Overcome Pain For Good

This post is sponsored by Lewonde

Back pain is one of the most common ailments in the US. Did you know that at any given time, around 30 million Americans are suffering from back pain? If you have a bad back, and you feel like you’ve tried every trick in the book to banish pain, you’ve come to the right place. Here are some suggestions to help you hopefully overcome pain for good.

Determining the cause

There are myriad factors that contribute to back pain, and the first thing to do if you suffer from chronic pain or pain that is getting worse is seek medical advice. When you see a doctor, they will examine you and ask you some questions about your symptoms. It may be that pain is associated with underlying causes, in which case, treating the cause could help to alleviate pain.

In other cases, lifestyle changes may be recommended. There may also be causes related to your job. If this is the case, a doctor may be able to recommend safer techniques to try and offer some tips to help you feel more comfortable at work. If you have severe back pain, your doctor may recommend further tests, such as an MRI scan. This will enable them to see if there is damage to the spine or the surrounding muscles or bone tissue.

Correcting your posture

Poor posture is a contributing factor in most cases of lower back pain. Your posture relates to the position of your spine when you’re sitting or standing. If your spine isn’t in an ideal position, this can increase pressure and strain on your muscles, causing discomfort. In this day and age, we tend to spend more time than ever sitting down, due to the prevalence of office jobs.

If you do spend eight hours a day sitting at a desk, it’s essential to make sure you understand how you should be sitting to prevent back pain. Your spine should be straight, your shoulders should be relaxed, and you shouldn’t have to crane the neck to see the screen properly. If you’re reaching for the keyboard or the screen isn’t level with your eye line, adjust the height of your chair or desk. If you don’t already have a specially designed ergonomic office chair, ask your employer to provide one. It’s very important that your spine is supported properly while you’re in a sitting position.

Maintaining good posture is not just important when you’re sitting down. You should also pay attention to your posture when you’re standing, especially if your job involves standing for long periods of time or lifting. If you do have to lift items as part of your job, use machinery for heavy loads and make sure you bend your knees and keep your back straight. When you’re standing, try to avoid stooping or slumping and keep your shoulders back.

Finding the right mattress

The importance of getting a good night’s sleep cannot be underestimated. If you suffer from back pain or you’re prone to bouts of discomfort, it’s particularly beneficial to find the right mattress. If your mattress isn’t perfect, this can cause back pain or make existing symptoms worse. Therefore, if you’re looking for a new mattress to help with back pain, try some different styles and brands and avoid going for the cheapest option. You often get what you pay for in terms of quality and durability when you’re shopping for mattresses. If back pain is an issue, look out for products that have been ergonomically designed. These mattresses promote relaxation and reduce muscle tension, and they provide support for the spine while you sleep.

Choosing the right forms of exercise

Most of us are aware of the benefits of doing regular exercise for our health and wellbeing. Living with pain can make exercising difficult, but you don’t have to give up on working out if you suffer from back pain. You may not be able to do certain activities, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t be active.

Aim for low-impact exercises and avoid anything that involves jarring movements. Lifting weights and jumping aren’t ideal for people with back pain, for example. Swimming is often recommended, as the water supports your body weight. If you want to stay active without risking injury, speak to your doctor or a qualified personal trainer before changing your exercise regime or embarking on a new training program.

Conditioning your back

They say that prevention is better than cure, and conditioning can help to reduce the risk of recurrent pain. Conditioning involves strengthening the muscles to make your body resistant to injury. You can do this with a physical therapist or by doing specific, targeted exercises at home. These exercises are not focused solely on the back. They also help to increases strength and suppleness in the hips and the core.

Examples of exercises include McKenzie stretches and dynamic lumbar stabilization. The aim is to stretch the back, build muscle, and improve flexibility. You may also find that exercises like those found in yoga and Pilates routines effective. If you’re new to these activities, it’s best to go to a beginner’s class. Once you’re familiar with the stretches, and you’ve honed your technique, you can then practice at home.

Posture

Back pain can make life a misery, especially if you have periods when pain intensifies or you have prolonged bouts. If you suffer from back pain, it’s always a good idea to seek medical advice. In some cases, there may be an underlying cause, and treating this should be a priority. Many cases of back pain are linked to poor posture. If you slouch when you’re standing or you tend to sit slumped in your chair at work; this can affect the alignment of your spine and increase tension in your muscles.

Due to most of sitting during a large portion of our day, it can lead to muscles being tight and pulling us into a position that leads to poor posture. To help release these muscles and let your spine relax and decompress, you can use a lumbar stretcher like the Lewonde Back Stretcher (pictured above). By stretching your spine, you allow it to decompress, which allows it pull in nutrients, oxygen, and fluid back into the discs. Therefore, alleviating your back pain, and hopefully letting you overcome pain for good. Plus you can use it to stretch your spine, or put it in your office chair to help you maintain proper posture while sitting. I use mine everyday and have noticed a real difference in the tightness of my back.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

You Shouldn’t “Walk Off” An Injury

While often used as a comedic device, the idea of being able to “walk off” an injury is nevertheless a persistent one. Trip and fall while out running? Walk it off! Stretch too far during a yoga class? Walk it off! However, here are some reasons you shouldn’t walk off an injury.

The whole idea is based on a fundamental lack of understanding about the human body. While there are some injuries which are temporary – momentary spasms of pain that will recede on their own – there is a huge threat caused by trying to “walk off” an injury that can’t be walked off. Of course, you have no way of knowing if the injury you have sustained can be walked off before you try it – but what happens if you give it a go, and what harm are you doing if you’ve calculated incorrectly?

Think About R.I.C.E.

You’re more than likely aware of what “R.I.C.E” means in an injury capacity, but if not, let’s be clear – it’s not this:

What it actually stands for is the way that you should handle an injury:

R – Rest
I – Ice
C – Compression
E – Elevation

While you might think you will always know which injury needs the R.I.C.E. treatment and which doesn’t, you’re probably incorrect. R.I.C.E. is not just for those sudden, sharp injuries like turning your ankle – it should also be used for gradual stress injuries, that you might not even notice are building up.

As a rule, if you feel persistent pain – no matter how mild – in any area of your body, it needs to be R.I.C.E-d.

Strength Through Rest

You might think that because you work out regularly, use supplements like AlgaeCal, and have done your research, then you know best. You know that resting an injury can sometimes be worse for it than anything; back injuries, particularly, have a tendency to get worse rather than better if you cease all exercise.

However, learning about the AlgaeCal plant calcium side effects and researching the latest exercise techniques does not mean that you have the power to see into the future. How do you know the pain you’re experiencing in the moment is the kind that won’t benefit from rest?

Put simply: you don’t. It’s great that you have educated yourself on the supplements you should be taking if you exercise regularly and know your way around dealing with workout aches and pains, but you can’t predict the future. It’s far better to stop the moment you feel pain and make a clear-headed assessment of what’s happening to you.

Pain Isn’t Embarrassing

As mentioned at the beginning of this article, the “walk it off” line is often used in comedic terms – i.e. someone walks into a door and is told to “walk it off”. This suggests that pain is an embarrassment, the fault of the person who is feeling the pain.

This isn’t the case. It might be embarrassing to trip over while running, but the pain itself should never be a cause for shame. Bodies go wrong. We make mistakes, miscalculate, and hurt ourselves – it’s completely natural. What is embarrassing is trying to carry on when your body is telling you to stop, thereby inevitably making life worse for yourself. Don’t fall into this trap; if something hurts, stop, evaluate, and then make a decision on how to proceed – no matter what anyone else thinks.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

3 Ways To Alleviate Running Pain

Running is a hard, but enjoyable past time for us. It gets us fitter, it makes us feel good by releasing endorphins into our system, increasing our quality of life overall! However, like any sport, running does come with pains and aches, some more serious than others. There are many different ways to alleviate running pain, and here are the best 3 ways to do it!

Get The Right Pair Of Shoes

Running shoes are incredibly important for the well-being of your legs. They properly distribute the weight of your feet across the sole and support your feet, unlike normal trainers. This is important because naturally, humans run on their feet! But in shoes, we run flat footed, and over extended periods of time, this causes damage to the feet themselves, the ankles and the knees. If you’re not running very often than a normal pair of running shoes will do you fine, but if you’re a more regular runner you need to get specially fitted shoes! Companies like FleetFeetSports offer fitting services and can find the perfect shoe for you, eliminating the risk of getting any foot related issues!

Stretch Out After Each Run

Stretching is also a very important component of running. When you exercise, your muscle contract and relax, however, due to the intensity of exercise your muscles don’t fully relax, instead they keep slightly contracted all throughout your run. If you get back from a run and don’t stretch out, you will continue to feel pain in your legs! Stretching forces your muscles to stop their constant contraction, meaning that you can relax and not have any problems. As an example, many runners will have stumbled across problems with the dreaded iliotibial band, causing a clicking whenever the knee is bent. This can be incredibly debilitating, however, if you purchase a foam roller from companies like Trigger Point there are stretches you can do to slowly nurse the IT band back to full health!

Get Physiotherapy

This is the last line of defense in alleviating injuries, and should only be done if you really need it! Physiotherapy differs from person to person as each problem is unique. However, they do offer medication and exercises after a consultation and examination of the problem you are having. Then a physician will take you through the necessary things you need to do. The treatment can often include massages and other muscular stimulation exercises. If you want to find out more about this topic, because it is very complex and specific, go to PainEndsHere.com. Companies like this are able to offer professional help for those that need it. So, if this applies to you then you should definitely reach out to one of these businesses.

So there you have it! The three best ways to alleviate running pain, any of these are guaranteed to make your pain go away. However, if it is more serious you need to make sure you see a doctor because you can’t remedy everything yourself! If you’re looking for other ways to avoid injuries when preparing for a run, read this.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Exercise Shouldn’t Leave A Mark… For Too Long

Often, exercise can feel punishing and painful. When you’re pushing your body to its limits, it’s easy to see how you might feel a small amount of discomfort. But, of course, this comes with getting fit. And, it’s something you just have to bear. Though, you shouldn’t be having to deal with too much pain out of the gym. A lot of people find themselves sore after working out with weights. And, this is very common. But, this type of pain isn’t one that will slow you down. Likewise, it’s not the pain we’re interested in. Instead, the focus of this post is the pain you shouldn’t be feeling after your exercises. And, what you can do to make sure you never feel it.

 

Unfortunately, a lot of exercises are complex and difficult to perform. This can make it a big challenge for people to make sure that they aren’t going to cause damage to their bodies. When you perform something like a weight workout incorrectly, you are putting too much strain on your joints, muscles, and bones. One of the best ways to avoid this sort of issues is through the use of a personal trainer. This sort of professional can teach you how to perform your exercises correctly. And, they can even give you tips and advice to help you improve for the future. One session could be enough to keep you safe. So, this is definitely worth investing in.

 

Of course, sometimes, you can’t control injuries. And, not all injuries come from performing exercises incorrectly. A great example of this is running. Not a lot of people realise, but running on hard roads and paths will force their joints to ensure constant impact. Over time, this will damage the joint, making it harder to move and causing pain. Along with this, impact activities can also damage your bones. To help alleviate this, you can consider using a supplement. It’s hard to find AlgaeCal side effects online, making it a great start for this effort. Supplements like this contain calcium. This essential nutrient will help bones strengthen and limit the chance of damage.

 

A lot of people are very stubborn when it comes to injuries. It’s easy to feel reluctant to go to see a doctor when you’re hurt, thinking it will heal, and everything will be fine. But, often, small injuries can often develop into something much worse when they’re ignored. Regardless of the time you have, it’s very important to see a doctor when you’re hurt by your workouts. This will help you to recover as quickly as possible. And, it will also give you a chance to get some advice from a medical professional. Doctors can discuss health and fitness with you, helping you to come up with new ideas.

 

Hopefully, this post will help you to start working on making your exercises less painful. A lot of people ignore this aspect of their life. But, it’s worth working hard to make sure you don’t have to deal with the pain of recovery or injuries. It’s worth being aware that a lot of issues can be completely avoided with the right work.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Five Simple Ways To Stop Chronic Pain Ruling Your Life

Living with chronic pain can be so debilitating, and cause untold amounts of physical and psychological strain on sufferers. Any pain that lasts more than six months is chronic, by definition, although it can come in waves, and sufferers may experience good and bad days. It can completely affect how a person lives their life – some people are forced to stop working, stop socializing, and some can’t even make it to the store for groceries. Medical treatments exist to limit the pain, including both prescription and over the counter drugs, but many people find that they are not enough, and have to look to themselves for pain management as well. If you’re a sufferer of chronic pain, or know somebody that is, and would like to know more about how to stop chronic pain from ruling your life, read on.

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Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

My Way Or The Highway: Could Your Attitude To Pain Make It Worse?

Whatever our approach to a healthy lifestyle, the truth is that every once in a while we all end up ill. You may recover sooner than most, or feel the symptoms more than the average person. But the thing that links us all is that we all get unwell from time to time. Your body just isn’t built to run at 100% all the time, but could your attitude to pain make it worse?

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Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Four Easy Ways To Lower Your Back Pain

Your back is a complex system of bones, joints, nerves, muscles and skin; which means it can be hard to determine what’s wrong when something doesn’t feel right. Typically, back pain occurs after long periods of sitting still, incorrectly lifting something, bending awkwardly, over-stretching, or overusing the muscles; which are how sportsmen and women end up with repetitive strain injury. However, there are a few things you can try to help relieve those shooting pains, dull aches or annoying twinges that seem to appear out of nowhere; here are ways to ease your lower back pain.

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Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Exercise Your Way Through Chronic Pain

We all make excuses for not doing exercise. Most of the time, these excuses are white lies or conveniences. Sometimes, though, chronic pain can make exercise seem impossible. When you’re in pain, exercise is the last thing you’ll be thinking about. The truth is, though, that exercise is still important to you. Those suffering from chronic pain gain more from doing a little exercise. A lot of the time, it’s inaction that causes aches and stiffness. If you go to a chiropractor, they will tell you to exercise! You should always check with your doctor before undergoing any form of exercise. While the movement helps in most cases, it’s possible to do yourself more damage. Talking to the doctor will also help you work out an exercise routine to suit you. Here are a few tips on activities you may want to try to help exercise through chronic pain.

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Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

No Pain – No Strain: Put Muscle and Back Pain Behind You

An intense workout can leave you feeling revitalized and refreshed to fatigued and in pain all in the same day. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is the feeling felt in exercised muscles between eight hours and three days following a high-intensity exercise and training regimen. This not only occurs in those who are less physically trained, but it’s also experienced by most people and professional athletes who take part in exercises that can possibly damage your muscle fibers, which is why we’re sharing how to put muscle and back pain behind you.

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Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

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