sprint

Guest Post – Sprint Workout: How to Maintain Muscle and Still Lose Fat

When you are sprinting, you always feel accomplished even if the sprint lasts for a split-second. Sprinting is one of the most intense workouts known by man. Olympic sprinters are capable of covering a distance of 100 meters in less than 10 seconds meaning that they output a lot of energy, concentration, and power.

Sprinting is a great workout strategy for persons looking to burn fat but maintain their muscle mass. Although it does not burn a lot of calories within the short period of the actual work, it is an effective fat-burning exercise after the workout.

Sprinting stimulates your metabolism level on a great scale and therefore after the sprint, your body burns a lot of calories and fat for close to some hours after the intense sprinting workout is over. Here we look at the basics of sprint workout and its effectiveness in helping you lose fat but maintain muscle.

Why is Sprinting Considered an Effective Workout?

Sprinting is effective in maintaining the muscle mass in your body and losing fat due to its nature of being a power-based workout. When sprinting, you make use of all your three energy systems i.e. aerobic, glycolytic and anaerobic.

Sprinting is considered as an effective workout as it not only burns fat in your body effectively but also pushes you to your absolute mental and physical limits. It requires you to fully focus on the workout at hand and push through the oxygen deprivation and muscular fatigue thereby making you become a powerful athlete in the end.

Important Instructions for Your Sprint Workout Sessions

Before starting on your sprint workout, it is essential to take part in a thorough warm up. This is very important as it prepares you both physically and mentally for the training session ahead while decreasing the chances of suffering from injuries. Here is an important guide to follow when warming up:

  • Low-intensity Cardio: You should have a CrossFit jump rope that you should use for jumping for about 4-5 minutes in order to break a sweat. Jogging could be another great alternative for a great warm up session.
  • Precise Sprint Drills — you should perform a series of skips (power skip, side skip, and front skip), lunges (stationary or walking) as well as leg swings (side-to-side and front/back). You can do these sprint-specific drills for about 4 — 5 minutes.
  • Accelerations and Plyometrics — you can do some light plyometrics like squat jacks, high knees, and skater hops as well as 10, 20 or 30-meter accelerations again for about 4 — 5 minutes.

Your warm up sessions are geared towards activating your body muscles and sharpening the reaction time in order to generate speed in a quick and safe manner. After warming up for 15 minutes, you will be ready for the sprints.
Sprint Workout

It’s possible to choose your preferred number of sets to take part in for an effective sprint workout. Here are some sets that can be used in a sprint workout:

– Four sets where you cover a distance of 40 meters at 95%, walk back to where you started and do another sprint. The sets should be done after every two minutes before taking a five-minute rest after doing all the four sets.

– A single set of 400 meters, where you should sprint as fast as you possibly can before taking a two-minute rest.

– Four sets of 100-meter strides where you take easy strides and cool down before walking back to the starting point for another set.

You can jog for half a mile and stretch a bit as a form of cooling down. Beginners should sprint once a week but athletes can do it twice in a week.

Other Ways of Burning More Fat and Maintaining Muscle

Apart from sprinting, you should also incorporate weight lifting in your workout program. Investing in a good Olympic weight bench will be important in ensuring you lift weights safely. Lifting heavy weights and sprinting very fast increases your body’s fat mobilization as well as muscle maintenance.

It is important to chart your progress in the weight room to note any reduction in strength as it could point towards a probable muscle loss. You can also invest in the best treadmill to build up your sprinting power and speeds for an effective sprint workout.

Tips to Becoming a Sprint Workout Pro

In order to become a pro in sprint workout, you ought to start slowly with shorter distances and work your way up. At the beginning, you should take adequate time to rest but as you get better the rest period should be decreased slowly. Sprint for the shortest period of time at your best speeds since it will be more effective than sprinting for long but at a less velocity.

References

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-maintain-muscle-while-losing-weight/

http://www.builtlean.com/2016/05/09/sprint-workout-burn-fat/

http://www.aworkoutroutine.com/how-to-lose-fat-without-losing-muscle/

Annie Jones is the main responsible behind the BoostBodyFit.com. She started off a bit on the chubby side, but went through the transformation and now enjoys the great health and looks great.

Non-Running Exercises That’ll Make You Run Faster

A lot of amateur runners think that if they just run further or more often that they will improve their mile time. Unfortunately, they eventually hit a plateau, and no matter how hard they train, they can’t break through it and continue improving. The problem with this state of affairs is that it can sap motivation and lead to despair.

The good news is that you can improve your mile time. You just need to stop running and try something else. Here are some non-running exercises that’ll help you run faster.

Up Your Game With Rowing

To get better, our bodies need to be challenged in new and unusual ways. The problem for most runners is that they don’t challenge their cardiovascular system and instead run at the same pace during all their training sessions.

One way to mix up cardiovascular training is to try something different. According to https://bodygearguide.com/best-rowing-machine-reviews/ rowing machines are a great way to prepare for a triathlon. Why? Because they help to tax the cardiovascular system in different ways to regular jogging. While your body is trained to deliver oxygen and nutrients to your legs, it’s less used to providing the same level of service to your back muscles and arms. Forcing your body to adapt to rowing will help when you next go out for a run. Don’t be surprised if you find your mile time coming down.

Single-Leg Squat

When you think about it, running is actually a series of single-legged jumps, one after the other. These jumps put tremendous strain on your knee joints and leg muscles. But despite this, many runners never bother to train their legs. In so doing, they put themselves at risk of injury and cause themselves to have slower mile times.

Single-legged squats are a great way to train for running says http://www.runnersworld.com. Not only do they improve the strength of the knee joint and leg muscles, but they also help the body balance itself biomechanically. Runners who aren’t biomechanically balanced or strong enough often run in a sub-optimal way to compensate. Strengthening the legs can help  prevent suboptimal gaits and make your mile times faster.

Foam Roller Pectoral Stretch

The upper body is one of the most overlooked regions of the body for runners. But it turns out that the trunk region, as well as the upper chest, are critical when stabilizing a runner in motion.

The upper body is important for another reason too: breathing. A stiff upper body that lacks strength can lead to reduced muscle function, low lung capacity and slouching. All these issues can then result in further running issues down the road.

Doing a pectoral stretch on the foam roller can help to reverse these problems and expand the chest area. Opening up the chest helps to stretch out the chest muscle, reducing the amount of rounding in the upper back.

Stretching out the thoracic is helpful too. To do this, lie with your back on the floor and put the foam roller under your lower back. You’ll notice a stretch in your core muscles.

Ally Gonzales is the creator of RunningSoleGirl. The go-to place for everything healthy lifestyle and conditioning for running. She’s a runner, speaks a total of five languages, and is a soon-to-be college freshman majoring in Exercise and Sports Science.

HIIT For Beginners

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is the second most popular fitness trend in the world. If you’re just starting out, then more than likely the more causal-paced interval training you’re doing is fartlek. For example, sprint as fast as you can for as long as you can, rest, run, then walk. HIIT is more advanced because you get more specific, such as one minute of sprints followed by 30 seconds of recuperation, then repeat. Plus, you’re working full anaerobic and aerobic thresholds. The more advanced you are at HIIT, the longer the work periods become, and the shorter the rest periods become as well. So here’s your complete guide to HIIT for beginners. 

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Ally Gonzales is the creator of RunningSoleGirl. The go-to place for everything healthy lifestyle and conditioning for running. She’s a runner, speaks a total of five languages, and is a soon-to-be college freshman majoring in Exercise and Sports Science.

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