strength

10 Reasons Yoga is a Better Workout Than the Gym

Physical exercise is good for health since it helps the body to remain fit. Regular exercise also helps the mind to stay in sound condition because it controls all the organs of the body.  As such, yoga is believed to be a better workout than gym due to different reasons.

Yoga is not a very new discipline in the area of fitness but is gaining significant recognition in different places. Yoga includes meditation, breath control as well as practicing different body postures and it has a strong link to Hindu spiritualism.

Many people interested in improving their spirit, physical health, state of mind as well as lower hypertension are turning to yoga.  It is also interesting to note that research shows that yoga also helps to reduce risks of heart disease, depression, anxiety, diabetes, and other cancer-related disorders.  

There are also other benefits of yoga, and this article highlights ten significant reasons why the form of workout is better than the gym.

Yoga Reduces Stress

Yoga is effective in reducing stress levels among different individuals.  It includes meditation which is helpful in clearing the stress effects of the day. On the other hand, the gym is characterized by heavy lifts and loud music that can contribute to your stress level.

Yoga also benefits the mind by infusing the spirit with positive energy. With a good mood and state of mind, there are high chances of living a healthy lifestyle. Gym primarily focuses on the physical fitness of the body but excludes vital elements like wellness of the mind and spirit.  

You Can Gain Self-Confidence From Yoga

The other important aspect about yoga is that it focuses on the “self.” It is designed to teach you about issues such as accepting your weaknesses and strategies to turn them into strengths. When you visit a yoga studio, you realize that there are no mirrors such that you focus on yourself most of the time.  

When you are practicing yoga, you tend to appreciate yourself. In a gym, some mirrors can divert your attention to look at what other people are doing. Gym classes can create that impression of failure if you do not manage to complete all tasks. However, yoga encourages you to do better.

Yoga Improves The Whole Body

Yoga practice is good for the digestive, circulatory as well as the nervous system. Through twisting and stretching, yoga helps the operations in the body to function normally. It helps the body to detox while at the same time improving the cardiovascular system.

At the same time, muscles in different parts of the body can also gain strength through yoga practice. A gym workout mainly aims at strengthening the muscles as well as boosting cardio. Yoga seems to be good for the whole body.

Yoga Makes Your Body Lean

By stretching different muscles of your body through yoga practice, you are making them stronger. A lean body is good since it gives you the flexibility you need to perform various tasks.

Gym workout, on the other hand, makes you muscles bulk due to heavyweights. Bulk tissues can affect the structure of your body. Some people feel comfortable with slim bodies since they give them a lot of advantages. A thin body, for example, has good stamina and it can react quickly compared to a bulk body structure.  

You Can Practice Yoga Anywhere

Yoga is different from gym workout in that you can do it anywhere. The portable thing you may require is a yoga mate and small space at home. You can practice yoga either indoors or outside as long as you have enough space to perform different styles of exercise.

A gym requires a big space as well as a lot of equipment.   If you want to design a gym workout studio at home, you must ensure that you have enough space more significant than a room. The issue of space might pose a challenge to those who live in apartments with limited space. However, yoga is possible anywhere.

Yoga is Efficient

You do not require weights as well as other equipment mainly used in gym classes. Yoga primarily relies on your body to perform different postures.  The whole body benefits through yoga, unlike gym classes where you work each muscle individually.

Gym classes take a lot of time to strengthen the muscles, unlike yoga that works the entire body simultaneously. There is also a need for specific equipment to work each part of the body, and this can be costly at the end of the day.  

Yoga Improves Breathing

Yoga is right for your health because it improves your breathing. When you perform different postures, the muscles around the nasal passage also flex. The other issue is that yoga focuses on breath since you take deep breaths along the exercise.

In stressful situations, deep breaths are essential since they help to calm the body. Gym workout can strain to breathe as a result of the weight exerted on the body. Gym class can build tension which affects breathing while yoga releases explicitly stress.

Everyone Can Practice Yoga

The other issue that makes yoga outstanding compared to gym workout is that anyone can practice it. The point of age does not affect one from practicing yoga. Yoga is beneficial to people with ailments and also helps the elderly adults to improve their health.

However, gym classes are not friendly to the senior people since their muscles cannot sustain the heavyweights. Yoga is also perfect for women since they can also perform a variety of postures without straining their muscles. The main benefit of yoga is that it does not twist the body with heavy workouts.

Yoga Soothes The Muscles

Gym workout is intense, and it causes pain to the tissues due to heavy lifts. On the other hand, yoga soothes the muscles by improving their flexibility. As you slowly perform different postures, the energy channels open thereby easing pains and aches.

If you practice yoga, you are improving your health instead of causing pain like gym workouts. Yoga helps the muscles to positively respond to pressure while at the same time soothing pain.    

Concentration Improves as a Result of Yoga

The other benefit of yoga is that it helps to improve your level of attention. The practice focuses on the state of the mind, spirit, and body. When you have a stress free memory, you can think properly, and this helps you to gain concentration.

While yoga is good for health, one thing that it cannot do is to burn large quantities of calories. Physical exercises like gym workouts are useful since they improve the process of burning the calories to improve overall health. Loads of calories in the body can affect the quality of sleep if the digestive system does not correctly function.

It is essential to perform traditional exercises on top of yoga to achieve quality health status. All the same, you need to sleep on the best mattress for long and peacefully rest. Visit our website for different types of best online mattresses can suit your comfort needs after performing some routine exercises that are good for your health.

Reference Links:

http://www.doyouyoga.com/15-reasons-yoga-is-better-than-the-gym/

http://time.com/4185626/yoga-exercise-workout/

https://sleepdelivered.com/best-mattress




Trish, which is her pen name, is a New Orleans native who works in the insurance industry. She is married and enjoys reviewing and testing out new mattresses in a quest for the best night’s sleep. She is honest and upfront without being pushy or sales driven. Read more.

How Aging Female Runners Strengthen Their Spine

Aging is a very natural part of life. It might not be the most pleasant experience though. There is a stigma attached to growing older. Society has an obsession with youth. However, there are ways to age gracefully and well. One of them involves daily exercise. Exercise keeps the body strong and limber. Running is a popular exercise that many men and women love to indulge in. Unfortunately, many women experience spine issues that are connected to running. As a woman naturally progresses in age, consider these tips to help strengthen the spine.

Wear Supportive Shoes

Supportive shoes are incredibly important when you are a runner. Your feet hit the pavement really hard and if you don’t have comfortable cushions in place to absorb the shock, this can end up damaging your joints. This will inevitably affect your spine. In order to fully support your body, make sure that you wear supportive shoes that are specifically for running.

Get Professional Treatments

Self-care doesn’t just apply to your body after a long day of work. It also can be applied after a workout. If you know that you have spine issues, it’s best to invest in osteoporosis treatments. To have a professional administer specific care to your back and bones is important. It’s also a good idea to invest in a good masseuse. Massages can do wonders for the lymphatic system and they can also do wonders for your muscles. When your muscles feel strong, this will impact the health of your entire body including your spine.

Work Your Core

Be intentional about doing exercises that strengthen your core. Your core is the area that supports your upper body and your spine. Your core involves your abdominal muscles, and there are plenty of workouts that you can do to strengthen your core. Consider developing a strength-training regimen that caters to this area.

Practice Good Posture

If you sit at a desk all day, understand that this can take a toll on your back. In addition to making sure that your seating is comfortable and supports your back, practice good posture. Work on making sure that you sit with your shoulders back and relaxed. Along with these four tips, make sure to remain gentle with your body. If you’re in the middle of a run and feel pain, slow down and walk. Don’t be afraid to take a break.

It’s also a good idea to try other low-impact exercises like swimming to switch things up. Consider running on asphalt instead of concrete. Asphalt is a lot softer to run on. That way, when it’s time to hit the pavement and start running again, you’ll feel ready to go.

Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym.

My Journey to Self-Love as a Runner

Can I get a little personal today? Some of you may know that I started this blog as a freshman in high school… at the age of 14, I knew I wanted to help empower women (men are welcome too!) on their fitness journey. Part of helping empower people is by helping them feel more confident which means learning to love yourself just the way you are. With that, today I wanted to share my personal journey to self-love as a runner.

I grew up running around a track, some of my biggest goals are running based. Running is a sport I’ve fallen in love with, but it’s been a rocky road with running. Even though I love my sport today, it wasn’t always so simple.

Despite growing up running, I wasn’t always thrilled about having a “runner’s body”. When I began to truly focus on improving in my sport, instead of focusing on improving my time, I could only focus on how my body looked. To me at that point, it didn’t matter that I could keep up with and beat others my age. It only mattered that I had larger quads and calves, strong arms, a defined back and core, but none of the other girls did. That for some unknown reason I was a distance runner with “thunder thighs”.

These thoughts weren’t limited to my early teenage years either; they were there up until I ran my first half-marathon just a few months ago – roughly 5ish years. It was at this point I was pushed athletically to limits I partially didn’t know existed. My entire life I was a 5,000-meter runner, with an occasional 10K thrown in, but it never occurred to me that it was because of my strong body, including my “thunder thighs” that I was able to quickly run these distances comfortably.

It’s been almost a year since my mentality of hating my muscular thighs, arms, back, etc switched to learning to love it. It’s because of my muscles that I can run.

My “thunder thighs” have helped finish numerous 5 and 10Ks and two half-marathons; plus running however many miles in each training cycle. Have pushed through however many 200, 400, 800m repeats. Lightly danced up a hill at the end of the race when you have nothing left in the tank. Somehow manage to keep pushing through even though your mind gave up a half mile ago.

I grew up not liking the way I looked because it wasn’t normal in my sport to look strong. Despite all distance runners being strong, it almost felt as though everyone else on the track could look strong but we couldn’t. The acceptance we see today is very new, but I’m glad that our sport is evolving. However, this acceptance goes beyond our sport. It’s becoming more prominent in other areas as well such as the fashion industry. A prime example is True & Co. who’s goal is to create bra’s that help women feel confident in their own skin.

Hopefully, with the evolution, our sport is going through, it will help give confidence to those young girls (or boys) coming up in our sport to love the way they are built even if it isn’t like their teammates. Despite the importance of that, I also hope it helps any of you out there whether you’ve grown up running or just picked it up a day ago, that no matter where you start you’re a runner. I see so many women constantly put themselves down in our sport.

Either because they have strong runner thighs, or because they “don’t look like a runner”. The beauty of our sport is the true diversity in it. I’ve toed the lines at many 5k, 10k, and a couple of half-marathons; I’d say 90% of the people there didn’t have what you would consider a “runner’s body”. It doesn’t matter how you look if you love running, yoga, powerlifting, whatever. Quit beating yourself down for not looking a certain way, learn to embrace your body.

Embrace it and learn to love it by understanding that without your “thunder thighs” you couldn’t properly perform in your sport. Without broad shoulders, keeping yourself balanced would be tougher. The list could go on, but you see the point I’m making. Your body is built the way it is because it adapts to the stress you put it under whether it be running, cross-country skiing, etc. I know it’s tough, but you can do it; you can learn to love your self just the way you are. Just takes looking at what you consider “flaws”, in a different light.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Warning! Your Rest Days Could Be Ruining Your Gains

If you set aside a couple of days per week to rest and recover from your workouts, then you’re on the right path. Generally, the concept of a rest day is a good idea and will benefit you. It’s not healthy to workout every single day, you’ll overtrain and damage your muscles, leading to no gains at all.

I won’t have a go at you for being a tad confused here already. Clearly, the title says that rest days could be ruining your gains. But, I just said they were good…so…what’s all that about then? The keyword in all of this is ‘could’. Your rest days could be ruining gains, but only when they’re not used properly.

Now, you will be surprised to know how many people wrongly use their rest days. Which is hilarious considering how easy a rest day should be for you. All you really have to do is rest and recover, how can you possibly go wrong? Well, I’ve written this article to show you some of the bad things you might do on your rest days that lead to a lack of gains in the future. Give them a read, and follow any advice that might help you stop doing the wrong thing.

Eating Too Much

The thing about a rest day is that you shouldn’t do much physical activity at all. As a consequence, you won’t burn many calories on these days, but that’s okay! This only becomes an issue when your food intake is large. I know so many people that sit at home on a rest day and just binge eat. They think it’s a chance to have a cheat day and just fuel up on food ready for their workout the following day.

The logic behind this is fairly well thought out, so I’ll give you credit if you do this. To prepare for your next set of workouts, you consume a lot of calories and carbs to provide more energy and get you nice and refuelled. A bit like stopping your car overnight and filling up the tank, right? However, as I said, you aren’t burning many calories on a rest day, so all that food is just going to pile on, with very few calories coming off. It makes it harder to lose weight and could be why you’re not doing so. Instead, you need to follow a low calorie diet, particularly on rest days. Try and reduce the calories, even more, when you aren’t working out. This prevents any unnecessary calorie overloading and will keep you on the right path to fitness success.

Doing Your Cardio

Bizarrely, quite a few people set aside their rest days for cardio. I know, it doesn’t make any sense, it’s not a rest day if you’re exercising. People do this as they think you only need a rest from generic training. If you train using weights, then cardio counts as a rest, correct?

No, it doesn’t. You’re still working your muscles, you’re still putting your body through some tough work, it’s not a rest. You’ll run the risk of overtraining, which is exactly what you should avoid by taking a rest day. Do cardio either on the same day as your regular workouts or on another day. Rest on your rest day, don’t work out in any way!

Not Stretching

So, there are certain things you’re doing that you shouldn’t be doing, and there’s one thing you need to do that maybe you aren’t. Stretching is essential if you want to keep your muscles healthy and feel less sore. If you lengthen your muscles, you become more flexible, less prone to injuries, and will see more gains in general.

You should set aside time during your rest days to really go through a full body stretching and mobility routine. The reason you do it on your rest day is because you should have a good hour or so spare where you’d normally work out. Get a solid stretching session in to prepare your body for your workouts and keep it in good health.

After reading this, it’s maybe more apparent how your rest day can go totally wrong. If you’re eating loads, still doing workouts, and not stretching, then you’ve really messed up your rest day. I can’t stress enough how important one or two proper rest days per week will help you. Use them properly, or you will see issues with your gains. If you feel like you’ve maybe hit a wall recently, then this could be the problem.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

How You Can Be More Active in Your Everyday Life

When we talk about being active and living a healthy lifestyle, it isn’t just about going for a run each evening but being completely sedentary the rest of the time. In order to be truly more active, then there needs to be some things that we change in our everyday lives. When we are always more active, at work, school or at home, then we are really on the way to living a healthy and active lifestyle. All of those extra things can help us to stay well. So what are some changes you could be making? Here are a few ideas to help you be more active in your everyday life.

Walk More

It might elicit a moan from you or your family, but walking more is a great way to be active. You’re using your whole body, burning calories, and getting your heart pumping faster than it would be in the car. Even something like taking the stairs over the elevator is a good way to be more active and walk more. Plan your time better to walk to more places and you’ll really feel the benefit of it. You could also look to get a step counter to encourage you to be more active. We should be aiming for at least 10,000 steps per day, but many of us fall short of that. You can read more here if you want to http://stepcount.org.uk/. So if you’re curious to see where you are with that at the moment, then a step counter will be a good way to start being more active.

Take Regular Work Breaks

Work or school are going to be some of the places where we find it hard to be the most active. We can’t just get up and leave when we want. However, we can take breaks to have a quick walk around the office or to get a glass of water. You shouldn’t be sat at your desk for hours on end without moving. Consider standing at your desk if you need to, to get your body moving and some weight bearing on your feet. You could even look into getting a bike or elliptical installed under your desk, like this one https://www.hereon.biz/under-desk-elliptical/. What a fun way to be more active when you normally wouldn’t be very active. Employers should take note!

Use Standing Time To Move

Think about times in the day when you stand up but don’t do anything. You might be waiting for the kettle to boil or for the oven to heat up. But use that time to get in a mini-workout. How many squats can you do in the time it takes for your pasta to cook or the kettle to boil, for example? When you’re having a phone conversation, how many times can you go up and down the stairs or do something else that is active like cleaning the house? Multitask and get a few more mini-workouts in each day and it will help you to stay fit and well much more than people that don’t.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

You Shouldn’t “Walk Off” An Injury

While often used as a comedic device, the idea of being able to “walk off” an injury is nevertheless a persistent one. Trip and fall while out running? Walk it off! Stretch too far during a yoga class? Walk it off! However, here are some reasons you shouldn’t walk off an injury.

The whole idea is based on a fundamental lack of understanding about the human body. While there are some injuries which are temporary – momentary spasms of pain that will recede on their own – there is a huge threat caused by trying to “walk off” an injury that can’t be walked off. Of course, you have no way of knowing if the injury you have sustained can be walked off before you try it – but what happens if you give it a go, and what harm are you doing if you’ve calculated incorrectly?

Think About R.I.C.E.

You’re more than likely aware of what “R.I.C.E” means in an injury capacity, but if not, let’s be clear – it’s not this:

What it actually stands for is the way that you should handle an injury:

R – Rest
I – Ice
C – Compression
E – Elevation

While you might think you will always know which injury needs the R.I.C.E. treatment and which doesn’t, you’re probably incorrect. R.I.C.E. is not just for those sudden, sharp injuries like turning your ankle – it should also be used for gradual stress injuries, that you might not even notice are building up.

As a rule, if you feel persistent pain – no matter how mild – in any area of your body, it needs to be R.I.C.E-d.

Strength Through Rest

You might think that because you work out regularly, use supplements like AlgaeCal, and have done your research, then you know best. You know that resting an injury can sometimes be worse for it than anything; back injuries, particularly, have a tendency to get worse rather than better if you cease all exercise.

However, learning about the AlgaeCal plant calcium side effects and researching the latest exercise techniques does not mean that you have the power to see into the future. How do you know the pain you’re experiencing in the moment is the kind that won’t benefit from rest?

Put simply: you don’t. It’s great that you have educated yourself on the supplements you should be taking if you exercise regularly and know your way around dealing with workout aches and pains, but you can’t predict the future. It’s far better to stop the moment you feel pain and make a clear-headed assessment of what’s happening to you.

Pain Isn’t Embarrassing

As mentioned at the beginning of this article, the “walk it off” line is often used in comedic terms – i.e. someone walks into a door and is told to “walk it off”. This suggests that pain is an embarrassment, the fault of the person who is feeling the pain.

This isn’t the case. It might be embarrassing to trip over while running, but the pain itself should never be a cause for shame. Bodies go wrong. We make mistakes, miscalculate, and hurt ourselves – it’s completely natural. What is embarrassing is trying to carry on when your body is telling you to stop, thereby inevitably making life worse for yourself. Don’t fall into this trap; if something hurts, stop, evaluate, and then make a decision on how to proceed – no matter what anyone else thinks.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

3 Ways To Alleviate Running Pain

Running is a hard, but enjoyable past time for us. It gets us fitter, it makes us feel good by releasing endorphins into our system, increasing our quality of life overall! However, like any sport, running does come with pains and aches, some more serious than others. There are many different ways to alleviate running pain, and here are the best 3 ways to do it!

Get The Right Pair Of Shoes

Running shoes are incredibly important for the well-being of your legs. They properly distribute the weight of your feet across the sole and support your feet, unlike normal trainers. This is important because naturally, humans run on their feet! But in shoes, we run flat footed, and over extended periods of time, this causes damage to the feet themselves, the ankles and the knees. If you’re not running very often than a normal pair of running shoes will do you fine, but if you’re a more regular runner you need to get specially fitted shoes! Companies like FleetFeetSports offer fitting services and can find the perfect shoe for you, eliminating the risk of getting any foot related issues!

Stretch Out After Each Run

Stretching is also a very important component of running. When you exercise, your muscle contract and relax, however, due to the intensity of exercise your muscles don’t fully relax, instead they keep slightly contracted all throughout your run. If you get back from a run and don’t stretch out, you will continue to feel pain in your legs! Stretching forces your muscles to stop their constant contraction, meaning that you can relax and not have any problems. As an example, many runners will have stumbled across problems with the dreaded iliotibial band, causing a clicking whenever the knee is bent. This can be incredibly debilitating, however, if you purchase a foam roller from companies like Trigger Point there are stretches you can do to slowly nurse the IT band back to full health!

Get Physiotherapy

This is the last line of defense in alleviating injuries, and should only be done if you really need it! Physiotherapy differs from person to person as each problem is unique. However, they do offer medication and exercises after a consultation and examination of the problem you are having. Then a physician will take you through the necessary things you need to do. The treatment can often include massages and other muscular stimulation exercises. If you want to find out more about this topic, because it is very complex and specific, go to PainEndsHere.com. Companies like this are able to offer professional help for those that need it. So, if this applies to you then you should definitely reach out to one of these businesses.

So there you have it! The three best ways to alleviate running pain, any of these are guaranteed to make your pain go away. However, if it is more serious you need to make sure you see a doctor because you can’t remedy everything yourself! If you’re looking for other ways to avoid injuries when preparing for a run, read this.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Avoiding Nasty Workout Injuries

Exercising is a great way to boost your overall fitness, but it isn’t always positive. There is a dark side of working out, and it is known as suffering an injury. Simply put, exercising places the body under a lot of physical strain, and the stresses can cause things to snap. When they do, it’s painful and very damaging to your health. Thankfully, they are avoidable as long as you follow a few simple rules. Even better, you can find a selection of them underneath.

Stretch Sufficiently

There is a difference between stretching and holding the stretch to give your muscles ample time to warm up. If you’re doing it as an afterthought, there is a good chance of an injury occurring. For starters, there needs to be enough strain to get the blood pumping around the body. The increased blood flow should heighten the muscles’ temperatures, and that will boost flexibility. Hopefully, this will be enough to prevent any unnecessary strain while you exercise. As a rule, there isn’t a one-size fit all policy regarding time, but 20-30 seconds is usually suitable. Also, don’t forget to target as many muscles as possible. The more you leave out, the higher the chance of a tear or sprain.

Cool Down

Almost everyone will warm up before working out, yet they won’t cool down. Now, copying the professionals is enough to put anyone off a cool down for life. The last thing you want is to jump in an ice bath after a ten-mile slog. However, their recovery process is a lot more advanced, and you don’t need to follow suit. In truth, a five to ten-minute walk which includes a couple of stretches should suffice. All you’re looking to do is replace the oxygen debt and lactic acid in your body. If they are present the next time you exercise, they could lead to a lot of pain.

Take PT Classes

‘PT’ stands for physical therapy and it might be the difference between substantial damage and staying injury free. You should know that PT isn’t only for people who need to recover from an injury. In fact, lots of people use it to avoid one in the first place as a weekly session acts as a safety net. The best physical therapist establishments all take on pre and post care patients, so there is no need to wait until it’s too late. The people that get ahead of it tend to avoid the nasty injuries which can sideline you for weeks and months.

Don’t Overload

In your quest to get fit, there is the temptation to take on too much work. Because having a rest day doesn’t feel productive, you might want to exercise every day. Although it’s commendable, it isn’t smart. Injuries happen because of wear and tear over time. By working out more, you’re increasing the tension that you put on the body.

The best option is to train hard over the course of a week, but take a rest day in between sessions. After all, the body needs to take a break too.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

An Essential Guide to Exercise and Illness

Whether it’s figuring out to what extent exercise can prevent illness, or to what extent illness prevents exercise, it’s important for fitness fans to know more about the connections between the two. It’s essential that you speak to your doctor about specific concerns, of course! But this guide to exercise and illness will help you get to grips with some of the basics.

Boosting the Immune System

The immune system and exercise have a strange and fascinating relationship. It’s also one that’s widely misunderstood. If you want to ensure you get the most out of your exercise when it comes to dealing with illnesses, it’s best that you get to grips with some of the basics. Research has shown that regular exercise can definitely boost the immune system in the long run; those who work out three times a week or so tend to get sick less often. But if you have a really vigorous, heavy-duty, long-lasting workout? Then your immune system may be temporarily weakened. This is why so many marathon runners feel ill within 72 hours of their performance!

Above and Below the Neck

So if you’re feeling ill, should you exercise? There are a few things to consider here. For many people, there’s a particularly useful gauge: if your symptoms are above the neck, then you’re probably good to go. If it’s below the neck, you should take it easy and avoid exercise. Some may find that above-the-neck symptoms prevent them from exercising unless they take something to ease the symptoms; here are a couple remedies that may help. Below-the-neck symptoms tend to include aches, muscle weakness, fever, and problems with the lungs and stomach. Exercising with such issues may make things a lot worse.

Exercise as a cure?

Some may argue that exercise will help you cure your illness faster. Because of the relationship between exercise and the immune system, this may seem to make sense – but it’s a specious argument. Certainly, a brisk walk can help expand your lungs and make breathing easier if your illness is making that difficult. But, in general, there’s no real science behind the idea of exercising so much that you help force the illness away, as though exercise were some sort of exorcism and illness merely a demon! Put focus on exercise when you’re not feeling unwell, and reduce the intensity of your workout if you are unwell – or, again, consider avoiding it altogether if the symptoms are below the neck.

The Dangers of Stress

Another strange but well-documented biological relationship? Stress and illness. Long-term stress isn’t simply a psychological problem, the way most people see it. Stress manifests itself physically, which is precisely why it’s so bad for your health in the long term. Specifically, it can play havoc with your immune system, making you more susceptible to illness and even exacerbating the symptoms if you do get ill. Something similar can be said for depression. Exercise helps relieve both of these problems, which is partly why it’s so good for long-term immunity boosting. If your illness is being exacerbated by either, then consider some light exercise to help banish them.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Knowing Why And How To Strengthen Your Core

If you’re new to fitness training or just trying to get back in shape; you might be wondering how important is it to strengthen your core in transforming your health? It’s often mysterious; with knowledge about it sometimes only circulated within professional athletes and online bodybuilding forums. But before you target this part of your body in a workout you need to know what it is and the function it plays in the human anatomy.

What is The Core?

The core is deemed as anything that is not your limbs, such as arms and legs. The core is where the human body generates balance and power in order to carry out a movement. The means that your glutes, hips, pelvic scapula and abdominal muscles make up the core of your body; which makes it the central structure of the body where the majority of your weight is centralized. And while the abdominal muscles do play a key role, training the core is much more complex than just focusing on getting a 6-pack.

How The Core Functions

As fighter jet pilots push their aircraft to the limit, the high-gs cause the vision of the pilot to fade, darken and eventually black out. Professional combat pilots rely on staying conscious while they perform combat maneuvers, and so their core must be extremely strong. Core-conditioning consists of sharp inward contractions to brace the inner abdominal muscles, lumbar spine, glutes, and to a lesser extent the thighs. Pilots do this, to keep the blood in their lower and upper body, properly circulating and resist pooling in their legs as this causes the brain to stop receiving a fresh oxygen supply. This is essentially why other athletes train their core so that the central strength of the body gives the rest of the body a strong platform.

Abdominal Vacuum Pressure

Working on your core is not recommended if you’re overweight. Tummy vacuums condition your transverse abdominals (TVA)which are known as the innermost, deepest layer of ab muscles. If you’ve lived a dormant lifestyle, your TVA may not be functioning at all; so getting a response is going to take persistence on your part. To perform this exercise; get on all fours, arch your back upward, and with a deep breath in, then out, as you exhale suck your stomach inward as hard as possible while your upper body maintains relaxed. Try to imagine it by pulling your bellybutton in toward your spine. Do this repeatedly while holding each contraction for 15 seconds at least 5 to 8 times each set.

Bent Leg Shrugs

This can be done with a barbell, but it’s best to use to the kettlebell. Bend your legs slightly, and while your arm is holding the weight, shrug your shoulders without bending your arms. At the same time, suck in your stomach with each rep. This will contract your abs and work deeper and deeper into the inner layers with each shrug.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Latest from Instagram

Copyright © 2018 · Theme by 17th Avenue