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Guest Post: 6 Strategies for Post-Workout Recovery

If you want to get the most out of your workout routine, you have to know how to recover properly. Your body needs some time to repair itself after every workout session, but you can speed up your healing if you include some critical actions in your post-workout period. We are bringing you a short list of actions you should take into consideration to restore your body more efficiently.

Eat Healthily

It is important to know how to manage your diet in order to get the best result. You need carbohydrates to get energy for your actions, so it is recommended to have them roughly two hours before the exercise. You will need them after your workout to regain your energy but in a smaller amount.

Working out creates micro-tears in your muscle tissue and you need protein to recover. It is crucial to consume enough protein right after your training because this is a critical period if you want to build up your muscles.

Rehydrate

75 percent of your muscle tissue is water. You have to rehydrate constantly during your workout to keep the performance of your muscles on a high level. Water stimulates your metabolism and expels toxins, so it is important to keep hydrating after a workout in order to prevent cramps and reduce muscle soreness.

You are losing a lot of water through sweat, especially if your workout routine is very exhausting. In that case, you should consider taking some sports beverages to substitute lost electrolytes

Take Extra Vitamins and Minerals

You should consume additional vitamins and minerals during your post-workout period in order to enhance the recovery of your muscle tissue and to reduce muscle soreness. Vitamin C is an important antioxidant and its consumption right after training speeds up your recovery. Minerals like zinc, iron, calcium and magnesium also help repair bones and muscle tissue after a workout. Magnesium is especially important during the post-workout period. It is important for many functions of your body, including the creation of the chemical called ATP. When you are exercising, ATP releases energy that serves as fuel to your body. It is important to control the level of magnesium in your body after exercising in order to prevent muscle cramps and loss of energy. You can easily control it by taking magnesium supplements after your workout sessions.

Get Enough Sleep

There is no quality workout without quality sleep. Your body and mind need an everyday reset in order to work properly. It is recommended to go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day. A good 8-hour sleep is the right amount of time for your body to balance the hormones level and eliminate the feeling of mental and physical tiredness. Anabolic hormones, which are important for muscle building, accumulate during sleep, and catabolic hormones, which are responsible for muscle wasting, accumulate if you lack sleep. So make sure to get a good sleep every night in order to properly recover your muscle tissue.

Massage

Massages can be very helpful during the post-workout period. It helps your body recover more efficiently because it improves blood circulation, reduces muscle soreness and provides you with a feeling of relaxation. You can combine massages with aromatherapy to get beneficial results. Aromatherapy massages provide you a unique experience of total physical and emotional relaxation. During this type of massage, you are being exposed to the calming scent of essential oils and a gentle massage provided by a professional therapist.

Meditate

The post-workout period is the right time for meditation. After you have got rid of stress and feel exhaustion and happiness caused by endorphins, it is much easier to concentrate and dive in to find your inner self. It is important to calm down and find ourselves in this fast-paced world and the feeling of fulfillment when you accomplish that during meditation is thrilling. You will get in touch with your inner self faster and deeper if you meditate after your workout. You will be more aware of every part of your body, so just close your eyes and concentrate on your breathing.

You don’t have to work out hard in order to get the results. Instead of that, you should work smart. Create a schedule of your weekly activities. Find enough room during the week for proper sleep, meditation, workout sessions, quality meals, and always find enough time to recover from a good workout.

Scarlet is a passionate writer and regular contributor at highstylife.com interested in fashion, lifestyle, and health. She loves traveling, you could say that she is a real travel addict, especially when she has a chance to visit some exotic destinations. She would tell you that inspiration can be found in the most unexpected places.

Avoiding Nasty Workout Injuries

Exercising is a great way to boost your overall fitness, but it isn’t always positive. There is a dark side of working out, and it is known as suffering an injury. Simply put, exercising places the body under a lot of physical strain, and the stresses can cause things to snap. When they do, it’s painful and very damaging to your health. Thankfully, they are avoidable as long as you follow a few simple rules. Even better, you can find a selection of them underneath.

Stretch Sufficiently

There is a difference between stretching and holding the stretch to give your muscles ample time to warm up. If you’re doing it as an afterthought, there is a good chance of an injury occurring. For starters, there needs to be enough strain to get the blood pumping around the body. The increased blood flow should heighten the muscles’ temperatures, and that will boost flexibility. Hopefully, this will be enough to prevent any unnecessary strain while you exercise. As a rule, there isn’t a one-size fit all policy regarding time, but 20-30 seconds is usually suitable. Also, don’t forget to target as many muscles as possible. The more you leave out, the higher the chance of a tear or sprain.

Cool Down

Almost everyone will warm up before working out, yet they won’t cool down. Now, copying the professionals is enough to put anyone off a cool down for life. The last thing you want is to jump in an ice bath after a ten-mile slog. However, their recovery process is a lot more advanced, and you don’t need to follow suit. In truth, a five to ten-minute walk which includes a couple of stretches should suffice. All you’re looking to do is replace the oxygen debt and lactic acid in your body. If they are present the next time you exercise, they could lead to a lot of pain.

Take PT Classes

‘PT’ stands for physical therapy and it might be the difference between substantial damage and staying injury free. You should know that PT isn’t only for people who need to recover from an injury. In fact, lots of people use it to avoid one in the first place as a weekly session acts as a safety net. The best physical therapist establishments all take on pre and post care patients, so there is no need to wait until it’s too late. The people that get ahead of it tend to avoid the nasty injuries which can sideline you for weeks and months.

Don’t Overload

In your quest to get fit, there is the temptation to take on too much work. Because having a rest day doesn’t feel productive, you might want to exercise every day. Although it’s commendable, it isn’t smart. Injuries happen because of wear and tear over time. By working out more, you’re increasing the tension that you put on the body.

The best option is to train hard over the course of a week, but take a rest day in between sessions. After all, the body needs to take a break too.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

An Essential Guide to Exercise and Illness

Whether it’s figuring out to what extent exercise can prevent illness, or to what extent illness prevents exercise, it’s important for fitness fans to know more about the connections between the two. It’s essential that you speak to your doctor about specific concerns, of course! But this guide to exercise and illness will help you get to grips with some of the basics.

Boosting the Immune System

The immune system and exercise have a strange and fascinating relationship. It’s also one that’s widely misunderstood. If you want to ensure you get the most out of your exercise when it comes to dealing with illnesses, it’s best that you get to grips with some of the basics. Research has shown that regular exercise can definitely boost the immune system in the long run; those who work out three times a week or so tend to get sick less often. But if you have a really vigorous, heavy-duty, long-lasting workout? Then your immune system may be temporarily weakened. This is why so many marathon runners feel ill within 72 hours of their performance!

Above and Below the Neck

So if you’re feeling ill, should you exercise? There are a few things to consider here. For many people, there’s a particularly useful gauge: if your symptoms are above the neck, then you’re probably good to go. If it’s below the neck, you should take it easy and avoid exercise. Some may find that above-the-neck symptoms prevent them from exercising unless they take something to ease the symptoms; here are a couple remedies that may help. Below-the-neck symptoms tend to include aches, muscle weakness, fever, and problems with the lungs and stomach. Exercising with such issues may make things a lot worse.

Exercise as a cure?

Some may argue that exercise will help you cure your illness faster. Because of the relationship between exercise and the immune system, this may seem to make sense – but it’s a specious argument. Certainly, a brisk walk can help expand your lungs and make breathing easier if your illness is making that difficult. But, in general, there’s no real science behind the idea of exercising so much that you help force the illness away, as though exercise were some sort of exorcism and illness merely a demon! Put focus on exercise when you’re not feeling unwell, and reduce the intensity of your workout if you are unwell – or, again, consider avoiding it altogether if the symptoms are below the neck.

The Dangers of Stress

Another strange but well-documented biological relationship? Stress and illness. Long-term stress isn’t simply a psychological problem, the way most people see it. Stress manifests itself physically, which is precisely why it’s so bad for your health in the long term. Specifically, it can play havoc with your immune system, making you more susceptible to illness and even exacerbating the symptoms if you do get ill. Something similar can be said for depression. Exercise helps relieve both of these problems, which is partly why it’s so good for long-term immunity boosting. If your illness is being exacerbated by either, then consider some light exercise to help banish them.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

Workout Recovery: Don’t Sweat It!

Every time you workout, you create tiny tears in your muscle tissue. This sensation is known as DOMS or the delayed onset of muscle soreness. Because of these microscopic tears, it’s vital that you recover properly after exercising. Otherwise, you will never fully reach your full potential, and that is a frightening thought. So, to help you out, we have come up with 4 of the best ways to recover after a workout. If you take these into consideration, you will feel like a million dollars. In fact, you’ll feel better!

Exercise Gaps

We know what you’re going through because everyone makes the same mistake when they’re over enthusiastic. You want to get fit, so you push your body to the limits. Yep, it feels like you’re doing the right thing at first, but then the stiffness starts and you can’t move. Simply put, you can’t exercise every day without feeling some pushback from your body. That’s why it’s essential that you leave gaps in between your workout plan. Do you like to go to the gym on Monday? Cool, but give it a miss on Tuesday. Or, do something that is less intense so as not to overload your body.

Hydrate

There are two things the body needs after a workout. One is nutrients, and the other is water. We will get onto nutrients in a moment, but let’s focus on H2O for now. When you exercise, your body uses what water you have in store to fuel the process. So, when you finish, you suffer from an H2O debt or dehydration. A lack of water will prevent your body from recovering from your last session, which is why you need to take on water. The average amount for a man is 3.7L a day and 2.7L for a woman according to www.mensfitness.com, but it should increase if you’re working out.

Refuel

Once you have enough water on board, it’s time to aid the recovery process with nutrients. As you know, the food you eat helps your muscles repair after an intense session. However, if you don’t eat the right foods, you won’t take on the proper nutrients and your body will suffer. This is where https://www.discountsupplements.ie comes in handy. Thanks to their range of protein products, there is no need to worry about your diet. Of course, you need to eat a variety of well-balanced foods to maintain your fitness. But, if you think you aren’t hitting your targets, there is always a supplement or two.

Sleep

Yep, sleep is the final piece of the jigsaw. You might not know it, but bedtime is the only chance the body gets to switch off. Sure, it doesn’t stop working altogether, but it does slow down. Plus, it also uses the time to regenerate muscle tissue. If you can develop a routine, your body will recover twice as quickly as it once did in the past. Yep, that is the importance of sleep to gym junkie.

As long as you follow these simple rules, post workout aches and pains should be a thing of the past.

Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

No Pain – No Strain: Put Muscle and Back Pain Behind You

An intense workout can leave you feeling revitalized and refreshed to fatigued and in pain all in the same day. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is the feeling felt in exercised muscles between eight hours and three days following a high-intensity exercise and training regimen. This not only occurs in those who are less physically trained, but it’s also experienced by most people and professional athletes who take part in exercises that can possibly damage your muscle fibers, which is why we’re sharing how to put muscle and back pain behind you.

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Ally Gonzales is the founder & editor-in-chief of RunningSoleGirl. Along with blogging she is also juggling attending college and majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a Sports Management minor.

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